Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that can cause a multitude of symptoms in any combination including impairments to balance, difficulty with movement, poor coordination, bladder dysfunction, sleep disturbances and poor blood pressure control. The disease was first known as Shy-Drager Syndrome. Currently, it is believed that MSA is “sporadic,” meaning that there are no established genetic or environmental factors that cause the disease. A few reports have described families with MSA, but this finding is probably very rare.

Common Questions about MSA

Is there a cure for Multiple System Atrophy?

Currently, there are no treatments to delay the progressive neurodegeneration of MSA, and there is no cure. There are treatments to help people cope with the symptoms of MSA.

What is the life expectancy of someone with MSA?

Prognosis is currently guarded, with most MSA patients passing away from the disease or its complications within 6-10 years after the onset of symptoms.

Is MSA worse than Parkinsons?

MSA-P is more common than MSA-C. The most common symptoms seen with MSA-P are those that are more similar to Parkinson’s disease, hence the designation.

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Patient Stories

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